geopsych
"In addition to advocating for a ban on neonicotinoid use here in Ontario, local organization Transition Meaford says that citizens can get to work in their own backyards by creating bee sanctuaries.
There are seven hundred and thirty indigenous species of bees in Canada, with Ontario being home to four hundred of those. Native species are crucial for pollinating native flowering plants, such as pumpkins and watermelons, blueberries and cranberries, which are more efficiently pollinated by native bees than by honey bees.
Such diversity of plant life plays a role in the health of commercial honeybees by allowing for a healthy diet, which, just as in humans, improves immunity.”
From The Buzz about Bees, by Jennifer Thompson.
The wood I sometimes walk in is in a little valley entirely surrounded by corn (maize) and soybean fields, which means these neonicotinoids are pouring into it with every rain. Our whole town is surrounded with such fields, so full of herbicides and pesticides that the weeds that provide nectar and pollen can’t even grow along the roads in many places. No wonder we don’t have honeybees anymore. This isn’t just about bees. It’s about farmers and food and nature’s whole living system starting to break down. Do what you can. Plant flowers, let weeds grow. Talk to people. It’s an emergency.
 

"In addition to advocating for a ban on neonicotinoid use here in Ontario, local organization Transition Meaford says that citizens can get to work in their own backyards by creating bee sanctuaries.

There are seven hundred and thirty indigenous species of bees in Canada, with Ontario being home to four hundred of those. Native species are crucial for pollinating native flowering plants, such as pumpkins and watermelons, blueberries and cranberries, which are more efficiently pollinated by native bees than by honey bees.

Such diversity of plant life plays a role in the health of commercial honeybees by allowing for a healthy diet, which, just as in humans, improves immunity.”

From The Buzz about Bees, by Jennifer Thompson.

The wood I sometimes walk in is in a little valley entirely surrounded by corn (maize) and soybean fields, which means these neonicotinoids are pouring into it with every rain. Our whole town is surrounded with such fields, so full of herbicides and pesticides that the weeds that provide nectar and pollen can’t even grow along the roads in many places. No wonder we don’t have honeybees anymore. 

This isn’t just about bees. It’s about farmers and food and nature’s whole living system starting to break down. Do what you can. Plant flowers, let weeds grow. Talk to people. It’s an emergency.

 

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